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Maxwell Johnson

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  • Further Issues In Eucharistic Praying In East And West

    $79.95

    Further Issues in Eucharistic Praying in East and West is a collection of essays concerned with the origins, development, and theologies of early Eucharistic praying. For students and teachers of liturgy, as well as all who seek solid, up-to-date scholarship on Eucharistic liturgy and theology, this volume provides current research on a variety of Eucharistic prayers in the churches of East and West.

    Essays and authors include:

    *Balancing Eucharistic Origins in the Work of Gordon Lathrop and Thomas O’Loughlin – Megan Effron

    *Shaping the Classical Anaphoras of the Fourth through Sixth Centuries – Nathan P. Chase

    *The Heis Theos Acclamations in the Barcelona Papyrus: A Eucharistic Liturgy without the Opening Line of the Christian Anaphoral Dialogue – Arsany Paul
    Chiasmus in the Anaphoras of Addai and Mari and Sharar – Paul Elhallal

    *The Egyptian Origins of the Anaphora in Mystagogical Catechesis V ascribed to Cyril of Jerusalem – Maxwell E. Johnson

    *The Theology of Sacrifice in the Anaphora of Byzantine Basil – Lucas Christensen

    *Authority and Confluence of Traditions in Aksum: The Heritage of the Anaphora of the ApostolicTradition in the Ethiopian Anaphora of the Apostles – Andrij Hlabse

    *Vernacular Translation of the Roman Canon – Julia Canonico

    *Igbo Translations of the Roman Canon: Inculturation or the Battle for the Soul of Latin? – Joachim Ozonze

    *Recent Thoughts on the Roman Anaphora: Sacrifice in the CanonMissae – Maxwell E. Johnson

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  • At The Heart Of The Liturgy

    $34.95

    From 1991 to 2012, Nathan D. Mitchell was the author of the “Amen Corner” that appeared at the end of each issue of Worship. Readers of Worship grew accustomed to Nathan’s columns as invitations to rethink the practice of Christian worship through a liturgical theology that was interdisciplinary, aesthetic, and attentive to history. With the soul of a poet, Nathan was always on the lookout for the turn of phrase, the image, stanza, or metaphor from other classic wordsmiths that could capture the liturgical insight he wanted to explore.For the first time, this volume assembles some of the most important of these columns around the themes of body, Word, Spirit, beauty, justice, and unity. In addition, Nathan’s former students offer substantive commentary through essays that invite the reader to consider how the themes raised by Nathan might develop in the coming years.This collection is a must-read both for those who admired Nathan’s contribution to liturgical studies and for a newer generation of scholars seeking to discern the frontiers of liturgical theology.Nathan D. Mitchell is an emeritus professor of liturgy in the Department of Theology at the University of Notre Dame.  In 1998, Mitchell was presented with the Berakah Award from the North American Academy of Liturgy for his contribution to the field. His many publications include the following books: Cult and Controversy; Eucharist as a Sacrament of Initiation; Liturgy and the Social Sciences; Real Presence: The Work of Eucharist; and, more recently, Meeting Mystery and The Mystery of the Rosary: Marian Devotion and the Reinvention of Catholicism.

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  • Origins Of Feasts Fasts And Seasons In Early Christianity

    $34.95

    The liturgical year is a relatively modern invention. The term itself only came into use in the late sixteenth century. In antiquity, Christians did not view the various festivals and fasts that they experienced as a unified whole. Instead, the different seasons formed a number of completely unrelated cycles and tended to overlap and conflict with one another. In early Christianity, the fundamental cycle was that of the seven-day week. Taken over from Judaism by the first Christians, this was centered on Sunday rather than the sabbath. As the early Church established its identity, the days of the week set aside for fasting came to be different from those customary among the Jews. There also existed an annual cycle related to Easter.

    Drawing upon the latest research, the authors track the development of the Church’s feasts, fasts, and seasons, including the sabbath and Sunday, Holy Week and Easter, Christmas and Epiphany, and the feasts of the Virgin Mary, the martyrs, and other saints.

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  • Between Memory And Hope

    $49.95

    This anthology surveys the development and theology of the liturgical year in the order of its historical evolution: “From Sabbath to Sunday”; “From Passover to Pascha” (Lent, Holy Week, Easter, and Pentecost); and “From Pascha to Parousia” (Epiphany, Christmas, and Advent). In addition, introductory essays on the meaning of the liturgical year and a short concluding section on the sanctoral cycle (“From Parousia to Persons”) are also provided. While written as a companion to standard works in the field, beginning with graduate students in liturgy and seminarians, this book is intended for all–pastors, liturgists, catechists, religious educatorsho seek to live according to the Church’s theology of time as it is reflected in its calendar of feasts and seasons.

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  • Sacraments And Worship

    $55.00

    The church’s development and use of sacraments has evolved in many ways from the days of the early church to the present. This sourcebook presents key theological texts that played a role in those movements. Johnson traces the history and theology of individual sacraments along with their liturgical context in the church’s worship, while contributing helpful background notes to give the reader the full breadth and depth of the church’s thought on these important topics. The book will be a useful resource to those studying the history of Christian worship and the development of the sacraments.

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